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Are fats actually bad for you health?

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Gytree Team
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Are fats actually bad for you health?

You may be wondering if fat is bad for you, but your body requires some fat from food. It is a significant source of energy. Fat is required to construct cell membranes, the vital exterior of each cell, as well as the sheaths that surround nerves. It is required for blood clotting, muscle contraction, and inflammation. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are examples of healthy fats. Trans fats made in factories are among the worst. Saturated fats are located in the middle.

Dietary fats are classified into three types: saturated, unsaturated, and trans fats. Foods containing fat contain some combination of these three, which are chemically very similar (chains of carbon atoms attached with hydrogen atoms). However, they appear to have different effects on the body. Saturated fats typically solidify at room temperature. They're abundant in animal products like poultry, and full-fat dairy milks, butter, and cheese. Saturated fat is also found in some plant-based foods, such as coconuts and palm oil. Unsaturated fats, on the other hand, typically remain soft or liquid at room temperature. These are more likely to be found in high concentrations in fish and certain vegetables.Monounsaturated fats (found in olive, peanut, and canola oils, avocados, almonds, pecans, pumpkin, and sesame seeds, among other foods) and polyunsaturated fats (found in olive, peanut, and canola oils, avocados, almonds, pecans, pumpkin, and sesame seeds, among other foods) and polyunsaturated fats (found in olive, peanut, and canola oils, avocados, almonds, pe (found in fish and seafood, sunflower, safflower, corn, soybean, and flaxseed oils, walnuts, and flaxseeds). Finally, there are trans fats to consider. Some foods, such as beef and lamb, contain these naturally. However, the trans fats that doctors are concerned about are typically industrially produced. They are created when vegetable oil is hydrogenated, which involves adding hydrogen to liquid oil to make it more stable.

During the mid-century saturated fat panic, trans fats were marketed as a healthier option. We now know that this was a huge blunder. Even a tiny quantity of trans fat tends to increase bad (LDL) cholesterol in the blood while decreasing good (HDL) cholesterol, increasing the risk of heart attack and heart attacks.

What kind of fat you eat is more important than how much you eat. Trans fats (found in foods like margarine) are known to contribute to cardiovascular disease, whereas unsaturated fats (observed in vegetable oils and fish) have the opposite effect, reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Saturated fats (found in butter and red meat) are in the middle.

Avoid foods high in trans fats. And you're probably better off eating unsaturated fat rather than saturated fat. However, there appears to be no reason to be concerned about your total fat intake. So long as you eat a wide range of real foods and limit your calorie intake, you'll be fine.

Fats bad for health unsaturated fat saturated fat
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