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How long does it take to get pregnant?

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Gytree Team
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How long does it take to get pregnant?

Verified by Dr. Vaishali Sakpal Rane (MBBS, DGO Obstetrics and Gynaecology, DNB Obstetrics and Gynaecology)

You've made the decision to jump into the pool of infertility treatments. Bravo for you! But when you take a breath, you begin to feel a bit anxious. What if I'm unable to conceive? If something goes wrong, what then? When will this be finished?

The good news is that the stork will arrive for nine out of ten women without the need for any particular medical assistance, despite the fact that these nagging worries are entirely natural and highly frequent. Contrary to what you might have been taught in your middle school health class, being pregnant does not always follow unprotected sex. Everything begins with ovulation, when your ovaries produce a mature egg that is ready for sperm fertilisation. It's important to get the time right since having sex when you're ovulating, which takes place roughly halfway through your menstrual cycle, increases your chance of becoming pregnant. The egg travels into the uterus after being fertilised by a sperm, expanding and dividing along the route. The fertilised egg implants into the uterine wall after a few days, resulting in pregnancy.

How long does it take to get pregnant?

It takes two to three weeks to complete this entire procedure, including intercourse and implantation. However, the process of becoming pregnant frequently takes a bit longer than that, as the majority of individuals who are attempting to conceive rapidly discover. Generally speaking, healthy couples who frequently engage in sexual activity without the use of contraception have a 25% to 30% probability of becoming pregnant throughout each monthly cycle. Over the course of a year, 85% of engaged couples who are attempting to conceive will succeed. Although the timing varies from pair to couple, the estimate holds true for all of them. The length of time it takes you to become pregnant depends on a number of factors, including your age, general health, reproductive health, and frequency of intercourse.

If you're over 35 and haven't conceived in six months or if you're under 35 and haven't conceived while actively trying for a year, consult your doctor. After receiving therapy, at least half of couples who are assessed for possible infertility will become pregnant. Finding out if the issue is with the potential mother, the potential father, or both separately can be assisted by a reproductive health expert.

Pregnancy reproductive health ovulation
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